Feb 24

Artifact Curation and Archaeological Research: Keep Everything

R.J. Sliva is Desert Archaeology's senior flaked stone analyst. One of the first questions people usually ask archaeologists—after “What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever found?”—is “Where does all the stuff go?” The short answer is “to the museum,” which is our shorthand for “artifact curation facility.” Curation is a hot…

The 2013 Guevavi Field School participants standing in front of the Guevavi chapel. Feb 10

Desert Archaeology-Partnered Field School Wins Diversity Award

Homer Thiel reports this week on recognition for the Guevavi field school. The Gender and Minority Affairs Committee was established to foster diversity and equity within the Society for Historical Archaeology and promote consideration of issues relevant to under-represented groups. The field school competition awards programs that increase participant diversity and/or…

Desert Archaeology photogrammetry UAV Feb 3

Desert Archaeology Cartography & the UAV Photogrammetry Revolution

This week's blog is by Mike Brack, Desert Archaeology's mapping director and licensed UAV airman. I am fascinated with the technological change I have witnessed over a 25-year career of archaeology, cartography, and land surveying. From plane table and alidade to transit to electronic total station to the modern standard…

Desert Archaeology artist Rob Ciaccio's reconstruction of a native settlement near the Spanish mission garden, Tucson, Arizona Jan 20

Transitions: Sarah Herr is New Desert Archaeology President

Incoming president Sarah Herr writes this week's blog. The featured image (top) is a reconstruction of the native settlement near the Spanish mission and mission garden at the base of A-Mountain in Tucson, by our own Rob Ciaccio. On Tuesday, I became majority owner and president of Desert Archaeology, Inc.,…

Knights of Pythias cemetery announcement in the Tucson Citizen, 1915 Jan 13

Tucson’s Abandoned Court Street Cemetery

This week's blog is written by Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology's historical archaeology expert. Hidden beneath the streets, sidewalks, homes, and businesses of an eight-block area located across the street from downtown campus of the Pima Community College in Tucson is the historic Court Street Cemetery. It opened in 1875, after…

Pit dug for corn-roasting experiments at Desert Archaeology Jan 6

Experimental Archaeology: Learning by Doing

Some men simply want to watch the world burn... particularly when it advances archaeological knowledge. Traditional technologies expert and long-time Desert associate Allen Denoyer led the team that built replica pithouses at Steam Pump Ranch in Oro Valley a few years ago. In the intervening time, Allen has observed the…